Book Review: The Sun And Her Flowers, Rupi Kaur

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Rupi Kaur is an Indian born Canadian poet who has recently received much popularity for her writing. She has written two books, each a collection of poetry. The Sun And Her Flowers is the second of these books (her debut book is called Milk And Honey). 

Rupi Kaur's poems are a modern way to read poetry. I am not and never have been into reading poetry. It just feels too much hard work for me, you have to think beyond the words, decipher meaning and draw your own conclusions. However, that's not to say I don't appreciate poetry. Some of the most beautiful and heartfelt descriptions come through poems. But I like to read poems that are easy to understand yet still beautifully written. And this is exactly what Rupi Kaur does. Although her subject titles are quite tough, her expressions of them are very touching. She talks about abuse, femininity, love and heartbreak. It's how she can take a simple truth and express it in such a way that touches me.

Writing about such profound subjects, the author can use a few words to sum up an enormity of emotions. A few words that are easy to understand but have big meaning. You don't need a dictionary to read her poetry. But I do find myself at times reading a poem over and over again to embrace its full meaning. I'm a person who often finds it difficult to articulate how and what I am feeling, which I believe is why I enjoy Kaur's poetry so much. It almost helps you to put into words thoughts and feelings that you may have struggled to speak or process internally.

Rupi Kaur's poetry could definitely be seen as over simplistic, particularly to the ardent poetry reader, but it will most definitely appeal to the younger reader or those who may not consider themselves fans of poetry. 

One of my favourite poems in this book is;

 

this is the recipe of life
said my mother
as she held me in her arms as i wept
think of those flowers you plant
in the garden each year
they will teach you
that people too
must wilt
fall
root
rise
in order to bloom